Your beard myths, debunked.

Makai SalonMyth 1 – Your facial hair will get fuller, if you shave more often
Shaving frequently absolutely does not make your hair grow fuller. If you shave often, you’re feeling the prickly sensation of hair growing back more frequently, which is why it may seem so.

Myth 2: Certain foods make your beard grow quicker.
No food or vitamin makes the beard grow faster. However, we need amino acids & protein in our diet to grow hair. Guys who are anemic often experience beard thinning.

Myth 3: Gray beards are coarser.
If anything, our follicles become smaller as we age. Gray beards are not much different than regular ones. If it seems coarse, it may not be conditioned properly or is full of split ends.

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side parts and headbands.

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If you haven’t heard yet, The Great Gatsby opens in May and you’ll definitely be seeing some stylish hairstyles and some seriously trendy fashion as well, everything over the top. How do you feel about the side part, and the headbands and hair accessories? It’s around quite a bit now, but obviously not as much as it was in the 20’s.

Are you washing your hair too much?

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Are you washing your hair too much?

This day and age the media leads everyone to believe that using the right products on a daily basis will deem you to have phenominal hyigene, BUT, can it be too GOOD?!?

What kind of question is that?

But really though, most people shower at least once a day, and nearly all wash their hair every day, but, you must know that hair can suffer if it’s shampooed too frequently, because….

…shampooing washes away natural oils

Shampoo is made to rid your hair of dirt and oil, but if you do it too frequently, you’ll be removing your scalps natural oils as well!

How Often Should You Shampoo?

It all depends on your hair type, your physiology, and your lifestyle, but most people should be washing once every 2-3 days to allow your scalp and hair some time to recover. If you have naturally curly hair and use few hair products, you may only need to shampoo once a week.

If you have very fine hair, it will look dirtier much faster. There are also other circumstances where a person may need to wash every day, such as in the case of swimmers. Chlorine from pools and salt or other contaminants from natural waterways should not be left in the hair.

Shampooing Tips

When you do shampoo your hair, make sure to rinse it thoroughly. Shampoo residue can leave hair looking dull and may irritate the scalp.

If you choose to shampoo daily, use the mildest shampoo you can find. Baby shampoo is one example of a mild product. There are also organic products that are more nourishing to the hair and scalp than the standard shampoos.

Give yourself breaks from shampooing, even if you normally wash your hair every day. If you have a few days where you have no meetings scheduled or other social interactions, let your hair go unwashed. You can even use the time to see how long it takes your hair to start looking really dirty. This can give you an indication of how frequently you should really be washing it.

If you’re not sure about your hair you can come in and ask for recommendations!

10 foods for healthy hair

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Better-looking hair can start at your next meal.”Just like every other part of your body, the cells and processes that support strong, vibrant hair depend on a balanced diet,” says New York nutritionist Lisa Drayer, MA, RD, author of The Beauty Diet.It can take longer to notice changes (both good or bad!) in your hair than in your skin. For example, “just one week with a poor diet can yield acne flare-ups or dry, sallow skin within days,” says New York City dermatologist Cybele Fishman, MD, “but with hair, it can take a few months for a nutritional deficiency or the effects of a crash diet to show up.”The nutrients you eat today help fortify the hair follicle — from which each strand is born — and the scalp that surrounds it. “Healthier follicles? Healthier hair. Healthier scalp? Healthier hair!” Drayer says.

Of course, there’s more to your hair than what you eat. Smoking, hormonal imbalances, and not enough sleep can also affect how your hair looks and feels. No magic nutrient can make up for those concerns.

Still, you have a lot more leverage than you might think. If you eat a balanced, varied, protein-rich diet that focuses on the following 10 foods, you’ll be giving your hair the TLC it needs and deserves.

1. Salmon

Besides being rich in protein and vitamin D (both are key to strong hair) the omega-3 fatty acids found in this tasty cold-water fish are the true superstar. Your body can’t make those fatty acids, which your body needs to grow hair. About 3% of the hair shaft is make up of these fatty acids, Drayer says. Omega-3s are also found in cell membranes in the skin of your scalp, and in the natural oils that keep your scalp and hair hydrated.

Other options: If salmon doesn’t thrill you, you can also get essential fatty acids from fish like herring, sardines, trout, and mackerel, as well as avocado, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts (see below for more wonderful things about walnuts.)

2. Walnuts

These are the only type of nut that have a significant amount of omega-3 fatty acids. They’re also rich in biotin and vitamin E, which helps protect your cells from DNA damage. Since your hair rarely gets much shielding from the sun, this is especially great, Drayer says. Too little biotin can lead to hair loss. Walnuts also have copper, a mineral that helps keep your natural hair color rich and lustrous, Fishman says.

Other options: Try using walnut oil in your salad dressing or stir-fry instead of canola or safflower, Fishman says.

3. Oysters

Oysters are rich in zinc, a lack of which can lead to hair loss (even in your eyelashes), as well as a dry, flaky scalp. Three ounces has a whopping 493% of your daily value. You can get some zinc through fortified cereals and whole grain breads, but oysters can boast a good level of protein too. “Remember, hair is about 97% protein,” Drayer says. Without enough protein, your body can’t replace the hairs that you naturally shed every day and what you do make can be dry, brittle, or weak.

Other options: Get your fill of zinc with nuts, beef, and eggs.

4. Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a great source of the antioxidant beta carotene, which your body turns into vitamin A. “Basically, every cell of the body cannot function without enough A,” Fishman says. It also helps protect and produce the oils that sustain your scalp, and being low on vitamin A can even leave you with itchy, irksome dandruff.

Other options: Carrots, cantaloupe, mangoes, pumpkin, and apricots are all good sources of beta carotene.

5. Eggs

A great source of protein, eggs are loaded with four key minerals: zinc, selenium, sulfur, and iron. Iron is especially important, because it helps cells carry oxygen to the hair follicles, and too little iron (anemia) is a major cause of hair loss, particularly in women, Drayer says.

Other options: You can also boost your iron stores with animal sources, including chicken, fish, pork, and beef.

6. Spinach

The iron, beta carotene, folate, and vitamin C in spinach help keep hair follicles healthy and scalp oils circulating.

Other options: Try similarly nutrient-rich dark, leafy vegetables such as broccoli, kale, and Swiss chard.

7. Lentils

Tiny but mighty, these legumes are teeming with protein, iron, zinc, and biotin, says Fishman, making it a great staple for vegetarian, vegans, and meat eaters.

Other options: Toss other beans such as soybeans (the young ones are called edamame) and kidney beans into your soup or salad.

8. Greek yogurt

Cruise the dairy aisle for low-fat options such as Greek yogurt, which is high in hair-friendly protein, vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid — an ingredient you’ll often see on hair care product labels), and vitamin D. Emerging research links vitamin D and hair follicle health, but exactly how that works isn’t clear, Fishman says.

Other options: Cottage cheese, low-fat cheese, and skim milk also fit the bill.

9. Blueberries

Exotic super fruits may come and go but when it comes to vitamin C, “It’s hard to top this nutrient superhero,” Drayer says. C is critical for circulation to the scalp and supports the tiny blood vessels that feed the follicles. Too little C in your diet can lead to hair breakage.

Other options: Kiwis, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and strawberries.

10. Poultry

This everyday entree is extraordinary when it comes to protein, as well as hair-healthy zinc, iron, and B vitamins to keep strands strong and plentiful. Because hair is nearly all protein, “foods rich in protein are literally giving you the building blocks for hair,” Drayer says.

Other options: Lean cuts of beef are another good source of lean protein.